Monday, November 7, 2016

Snapshot: Log Rot Repair

Preventing log rot is as easy as keeping moisture out of the wood. Unfortunately, sometimes what is relatively easy goes unnoticed and time goes by until water has done its damage. Anything from upward facing cracks to leaky gutters to absence of gutters altogether can drive water into the wood and feed a situation of decay. Prevention is key, but if it's too late for that, here is a snap shot on how to repair rotten wood on your log home.

1. First survey the damage. If the log rot is extensive where full or partial log replacement is required, then you may want to call in a log home restoration professional if you're own carpentry skills are lacking. At Schroeder Log Home Supply we don't do the restoration work ourselves, but we have a collection of contractors listed in our system and we can put you in touch with them. Give us a call at 1-800-359-6614.

2. If the log rot is manageable, remove all wood that is decayed soft beyond the point of salvaging. i.e. If you can scoop it out by hand, get rid of it!

3. Drill small holes in the decayed area (1/8" or so) to perforate the wood and allow for better penetration of preservative and hardener.

4. Apply a borate wood preservative, such as PeneTreat, ArmorGuard, or ShellGuard RTU to kill the rot, and allow the wood to dry out. Brush and spray into the holes and throughout the decayed area.

5. Mix and apply a two-part epoxy wood hardener like LiquidWood or M-Balm. Inject into the holes and cracks and brush throughout decayed area.

6. Mix and apply a two-part epoxy wood filler like WoodEpox or E-Wood. Mix together the two parts, and add pigment to more closely match the surrounding wood. (although the epoxy filler will accept stain, its lighter color may show up contrasted against the rest of the log when using a semi-transparent stain). While still pliable, a brush or sharp tool may be used to etch in lines to mimic the surrounding wood grain.

7. After it's cured, the epoxy wood fillers can be sanded and painted or stained like wood. Finally, make sure that whatever issue caused water to flow into the wood in the first place is solved.

The restoration snapshot above is for informational purposes, but actually procedure required may vary by situation. Call us at 1-800-359-6614 with any questions or concerns or to find a local restoration contractor.